Find and Offer Help During Self Isolation

Get Involved
I need help
I can help
Amber A
United States
Added: 05.04.2020

I haven’t ben able to go to the gym because of the virus, and so I’m looking for someone to lead me through work-outs through Skype or some other video platform. Trying to stay accountable.

See details
Share on Facebook
Tweett
Ethel Frye
United States
Added: 03.04.2020

My grandma is 82 years old. She lives alone, her sight is weak, and she can’t cook anymore. I am stuck in London on quarantine, so I am very nervous about her well-being and mental state. She is now staying at home in Norfolk, VA. I am looking for someone to cook her a nice meal, deliver it, and have a little warm chat with my granny. All of the items will be paid for separately.

See details
Share on Facebook
Tweett
Alice C. Lambert
United States
Added: 03.04.2020

Hello, I am a 67 years old woman living in Union County, New Jersey, and I must confess, I am really feeling the brunt of this quarantine. I have had a series of medical conditions over the last few years that have left me confined to a wheelchair and left my health, not at 100 percent.

I’m quickly running low on my meds and other home supplies, and I’m seriously terrified of going out to get some, as I have learned that older people are more likely to experience fatal complications from the Covid-19 Virus.

I am alone and well right now, but in need of quick help. I need someone who can regularly help with my shopping; this will include my medication, groceries, and other home supplies. I’ll be most grateful.

See details
Share on Facebook
Tweett

Find Help

Access highly rated helpers that want to help you during your self-isolating.

Offer Help

Tell about how you could help people to stay at home during their quarantine.

Post for free

Post jobs for free to connect with people in your area and help each other.

Bat soup china coronavirus

Is bat soup a delicacy in China? We debunk a rumour on the origin of the coronavirus Coronavirus outbreak could be linked to bat soup say scientists The video of Wang went viral amid claims it was filmed at a "Wuhan restaurant". 1. People eating bats in Wuhan What are the symptoms. One-day-old baby girl dies after her covid-positive mom on a ventilator goes into premature labor in . A video of a woman eating 'bat soup' recently went viral, and linked the food to the coronavirus outbreak in Wuhan, China. That video theory, however, is a rumor, though coronavirus may have. Jan 23,  · A recent outbreak in China of a new strand of coronavirus may be linked to an objectively disgusting Chinese delicacy called bat soup, according to reports. Video footage online shows an entire cooked, dead bat sitting in soup. Scientists believe that the virus, which has killed 17 and infected over people, could have spread from snakes or. Jan 23,  · The source of the outbreak is still unknown, but some experts have suggested that the cause of the virus could be linked to fruit bats which are part of an unusual soup which is widely consumed Chinese delicacy. Coronavirus: bat soup. Footage of people eating the potentially lethal soup have emerged on social media this week. Sign up now to receive Editors' Picks, a curated selection of FP's must-read stories.

The coronavirus outbreak likely started in a Wuhan wet market: photos - Business Insider Bat soup, dodgy cures and 'diseasology': the spread of coronavirus misinformation Across mainland China, hundreds of similar markets offer a wide range of exotic animals for a range of purposes. A new study shows that the early known victims had no contact with the market. 2. It’s a deliberate plot At many wet markets, me. Although it is unclear which animal transferred the virus to humans -- bat, snake and pangolin have all been suggested -- China has. Since at least the third week of January, there's been this perception that COVID-​19 started when someone had “bat soup.”. Fox News Host Claims Chinese People Eating 'Raw Bats' to Blame for Coronavirus. 'NO, JESSE!' “They are very hungry people,” Watters said. It isn't clear what chna the ban might have on the industry's future -- but there are signs China's population may have already been turning away from eating wild animals even before the epidemic.